Writing Program Learning Outcomes

ISU Writing Program Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes for English 101-series courses

  1. Identifying Genres: Students should be able to articulate features of multiple academic and non-academic genres, including how those features shape content and reader expectations, as well as how their writing does/doesn’t conform to generic features.
  2. Creating Content: Students should be able to create content in multiple genres, analyze their use of rhetorical strategies in producing genre productions, and articulate how those strategies shape texts and their production.
  3. Organizing Information in Multiple Genres: Students should be able to identify and articulate the organizational structures that govern different kinds of genres.
  4. Technology/Media: Students should be able to identify the technologies/tools necessary to produce different genres, articulate how texts are affected by the technologies they employ, and select appropriate technologies to produce their own texts.
  5. The Trajectories of Literate Activity: Students should be able to trace the trajectories of texts in relation to the social, historical contexts that shape them.
  6. Flexible Research Skills: Students should be able to find and utilize a variety of source materials and data-collection methods for research purposes.
  7. Using Citation Formats and Citing Source Material in Multiple Genres: Students should investigate one or more academic citation styles, integrate source material into their written projects to support rhetorical goals, and cite source material correctly according to those styles.
  8. Grammatical Usage and Sentence Structure: Students should be able to articulate how sentence structure, grammar and vocabulary define particular genres, then use those conventions appropriately in their own productions and identify/revise any areas for improvement.
  9. Cultural and Social Contexts: Students should be able to identify cultural, political and social interactions that shape writing in particular genres as well as how texts respond to sociocultural influences.

 

Learning Outcomes for English 145-Series Courses

The primary goal of English 145 is to prepare students for the continuation of writing and researching in their academic disciplines as well as preparing students for writing and researching within their professional fields.

1. Identifying Genres

  • Students should be able to identify and articulate the features of genres in their academic discipline and/or in their potential career fields. They should also be able to articulate how discipline and field specific information are shaped by a range of genres common to that field’s discourse.

2. Creating Content for Multiple Settings and Modalities

  • Students should be able to create content in multiple genres, particularly genres related to working and learning in various types of business-related settings in the workplace and in academia; they should be able to identify different types of rhetorical strategies and employ them in their writing; they should be able to employ a range of other skills (a knowledge of mechanics, style, different production modalities, etc.) and defend their choices as a thoughtful response to specific writing and genre situations.
  • Students should be able to demonstrate (through written or verbal communication) how a given text is affected by the use of different technologies or media (in terms of its conception, production, and distribution, as well as the potential ways the text may be taken up by users).

3. Flexible Research Skills

  • Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of what constitutes research (and valid, reliable source material) within their professional fields; they should be familiar with a variety of data collection methods specific to their fields; they should be able to identify and use library databases, scholarly journals, and trade journals used most frequently within their major area of study and within their professional fields.

4. Using Citation Formats and Citing Source Materials

  • Students should have a general understanding of the different types of citation styles used in academic disciplines (MLA, APA, Chicago Manual of Style, etc.), but should also be able to use alternative means of citing (or giving credit to sources) in non-academic genres.
  • Students should be able to integrate source material into written, visual, and multi-modal genres.

5. Discourse Communities

  • Students should demonstrate an understanding of how written, oral and visual communication is shaped by discourse communities within their academic discipline and/or professional field; as well as an understanding that different discourse communities (especially within different fields and different workplace settings) differently shape the manner in which genres are produced.

6. The Trajectories of Literate Activity

  • Students should be able to employ a practical knowledge about the trajectories of texts in order to solve writing problems that include the following elements:
    • The trajectory of any text or genre is not simple, unidirectional, or isolated; instead, the trajectory of a given text is complex, multi-directional, and non-linear.
    • The trajectory of a text does not end once it has reached its desired/designated receiver.
    • Individuals and groups that receive a text (and use it) may do so in ways that are unexpected or unintended by the author/producers.

7. Globalization, Cultural Contexts and Diversity

  • Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how to produce genres in ways that take international, multicultural, and culturally diverse settings, practices, and ideologies into consideration.

8. Ethics

  • Students should be familiar with (and adhere to) the codes of conduct, ethical behaviors and practices, and guidelines for responsible research within their professional fields.
  • Students should be solve writing problems in which that definition of ethical behavior may be interpreted differently within different cultural, social, and global contexts.