Instructor Resources – (Multi)Media and (Multi)Modalities: The Forms, Structures, Tools, and Modes of Writing

Students will be expected to demonstrate skill at moving content between different modes and media.

 

Learning About

Video – What is a Mode?

Description: Gunther Kress explains what a mode is.

What’s it good for?: A basic, but theoretical approach to understanding modes.

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Author: Gunther Kress

 

Video – What is Multimodality?

Description: Gunther Kress explains what multimodality is.

What’s it good for?: A basic, but theoretical approach to understanding multimodality.

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Author: Gunther Kress

 

Video – How do People Choose Between Modes?

Description: Gunther Kress examines the importance of selecting modes for a specific composition and unpacks how to select modes for your compositions.

What’s it good for?: Further understanding how mode choice impacts the final product and how the mode selection process unfolds.

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Author: Gunther Kress

 

Webtext – Where Access Meets Multimodality: The Case of ASL Music Videos

Description: Discussing how multimodal composition interacts with issues of access through American Sign Language music videos.

What’s it good for?: Connecting multimodal composition to issues of access, disability, and embodiment.

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Author: Janine Butler

 

Archive – Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives (DALN)

Description: A massive archive of student/instructor/user literacy narratives in a variety of forms (audio, visual, linguistic, etc.) collected by Ohio State University.

What’s it good for?: Giving students examples of multimodal projects. Also, examining a variety of literacies in different formats.

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Author: Ohio State University

 

Article – S-Town and the Discomfort of Multimodality

Description: Identifies connections between multimodality and the NPR podcast “S-Town.”

What’s it good for?: Connecting theories of multimodality to practical examples that students would enjoy.

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Author: Sara West

 

Podcast – S-Town

Description: Fictional podcast story created by NPR that inspired article above.

What’s it good for?: Instructors seeking multimodal examples beyond the Grassroots Writing Research Journal and other text-focused works.

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Author: Brian Reed

 

Our Favorite Grassroots Articles on Multimedia and Multimodality

Issue 2.2 – Reading Visual Texts: A Bullet for Your Arsenal

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Student Readability Rating: 10 – perfect for students!

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Author: Susana Rodriguez

 

Issue 4.1 – Eating Genre for Breakfast: The Cereal Box Experience

Description: Soares investigates the genre of cereal boxes through personal interviews with friends and grocery store employees as well as a brief case study with his children. He attempts to better understand the relationship between cereal box design/cereal ingredients/placement and assumed audience.

What’s it Good for?: This is a perfect article to introduce the topic of “genre” to your students by relating to a genre they are all familiar with that is not merely music or movie genres. The article also touches upon various multimodal aspects of cereal box design that could be discussed further in class.

Student Readability Rating: 10 – perfect for students!

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Author: Michael Soares

 

Issue 7.1 – Powering Through the Pain: Producing a Podcast

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What’s it Good For?:

Student Readability Rating: 10 – perfect for students!

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Author: Annie Hackett

 

Issue 8.1 – To Judge a Book by Its Cover: A Genre Analysis About the Cover of a Book

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What’s it Good for?:

Student Readability Rating: 10 – perfect for students!

Author: Sarah Lyons

 

Background, In-Depth, and Related Resources

Video – Why Adopt a Multimodal Approach?

Description: Gunther Kress explains why multimodality is integral to composition studies.

What’s it good for?: Explains the importance of multimodality and why it is necessary for composition studies.

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Author: Gunther Kress

 

Article – Myths of Multimodal Composing

Description: Examines and demystifies some of the most common myths surrounding multimodal composition and how students react to it.

What’s it good for?: Dispelling common myths about multimodal composition and better understanding the basics.

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Author: Amy Braziller and Elizabeth Kleinfeld

 

Article – Creating Multimodal Assignments to Develop 21st Century Literacies

Description: Advice for multimodal assignments – especially concerning digital literacies.

What’s it good for?: Learning how to integrate multimodal assignments into your course plan while accounting for 21st century student literacies.

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Author: Elizabeth Kleinfeld and Amy Braziller

 

Article – Evaluating Multimodal Assignments

Description: How to better evaluate assignments you might not be as familiar with.

What’s it good for?: Learning how to evaluate assignments beyond linguistic expectations.

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Author: Elizabeth Kleinfeld and Amy Braziller

 

Article – Anxiety and Technology in the Classroom: Identification and Solutions for Multimodal Inclusivity

Description: How to move past technology gaps and still create a composition class atmosphere that supports multimodal composition.

What’s it good for?: Instructors who feel as though they do not have a strong technological background, but still want to focus on multimodal composition.

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Author: Kristeen Cherney

 

TED Talk – Your Body Language May Shape Who You Are

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Author: Amy Cuddy

 

Webtext – Technological Familiarity and Multimodality: A Localized and Contextualized Model of Assessment

Description: Outlines a model of assessment for multimodal assignments and projects.

What’s it good for?: Understanding how to assess multimodal projects beyond text-based compositions.

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Author: Jeffrey A. Bacha

 

Blog Post – Cultural Implications: the Genre of Greetings and “Global Citizenship” Skills

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AuthorsCristina Sánchez-Martín and Erika Romero

 

Video Clip – Lineup Formations as Multimodal Genres

Description: Coach Wes Gaddis shows students a line-up formation graphic, a multimodal genre. Not only does it explain the use of number, letters and symbols, it also shows how the spatial mode of communication carries a lot of meaning.

What’s it Good for?: 

Student Readability Rating: 10 – perfect for students!

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Author: Wes Gaddis

 

Podcast – Let’s CHAT: Pairing Multimodality and Multimedia with Translingualism and Cultural Approaches to Literate Practices

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Authors: Cristina Sánchez-Martín, Courtney Cox, and Demet Yigitbilek

 

ISU Teachers Create

Handout – Multimodality Handout

Description: Gives basic definition of multimodality, list of modes, and a collection of Grassroots Writing Research Journal Articles associated with Multimodality.

What’s it good for? A basic understanding of multimodality and a good collection of GWRJ articles to teach multimodality.

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Author: Frank Macarthy

 

Assignment – Stripping Your Textbook

Description: An assignment based on taking a section of a textbook and turning it into a comic.

What’s it good for?: A good example of a multimodal assignment that practically explores how different modes can affect different compositions.

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Author: Frank Macarthy

 

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