Kathleen Yancey – Visiting Speaker 2015-2016

The Transfer of Writing Knowledge and Practice: What We Know, What We’re Learning

This year, we have the privilege of being joined by Dr. Kathleen Yancey. Dr. Yancey’s current research focuses on transfer and teaching for transfer. In addition to a workshop on portfolio use in the writing classroom, Yancey will present a talk in which she uses six lenses through which we can view our current research efforts addressing questions of transfer, suggesting that collectively they function as a heuristic helping us see both what we think we have learned about transfer in writing and what we need still to learn.

Bio

Kathleen Blake Yancey is Kellogg W. Hunt Professor of English and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University. She has served as President of SAMLA; President of NCTE; Chair of CCCC; and President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. Immediate Past Editor of College Composition and Communication, she currently co-directs the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research, which has brought together over 60 institutions worldwide to research various dimensions of ePortfolios. In addition, she is leading a multi-site research group studying the efficacy of the Teaching for Transfer (TFT) writing curriculum. Author/ co-author of over 90 articles and chapters and author/co-editor of twelve scholarly books–including Reflection in the Writing Classroom; Delivering College Composition: The Fifth Canon; Electronic Portfolios 2.0; and Writing across Contexts: Transfer, Composition, and Sites of Writing–she is the recipient of several awards, including the FSU Graduate Mentor Award, the WPA Best Book Award, and the CCCC Research Impact Award.

Evening Talk (Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 7:00 PM in STV 101)

The Transfer of Writing Knowledge and Practice: What We Know, What We’re Learning

For a bit more than a decade, since the publication of David Smit’s The End of Composition Studies, the field of writing studies has been studying what we call the “transfer question”: how we can support students’ transfer of knowledge and practice as writers move from one composing site to another. Within the last several years, articles on the topic have appeared in our major journals—in College Composition and Communication; Written Communication;  Teaching English in the Two-Year College; WPA: Writing Program Administration; Journal of Second Language Writing; and in a special issue of College Forum focused on transfer. Likewise, several books pursuing transfer have been recently published, including Beaufort’s College Writing and Beyond, Nowecek’s Agents of Integration, and Writing across Contexts: Transfer, Composition, and Sites of Writing, which Yancey co-authored with Liane Robertson and Kara Taczak. Given all this activity—especially given all this activity—how can we make sense of all that we are learning about the transfer of knowledge and practice in writing?

In this talk, Yancey will use six lenses through which we can view our current research efforts addressing questions of transfer, suggesting that collectively they function as a heuristic helping us see both what we think we have learned about transfer in writing and what we need still to learn.

Lunchtime Workshop (Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 11:00 AM in STV 133)

Portfolios and Reflection: Strategie for Engaging Students

When we first began working with print portfolios, reflection tended to mean process memos; fast forward to electronic portfolios, however, and we find that reflection has various foci, from tagging multimedia artifacts to theorizing rhetorical design. In this session, we’ll talk about options for reflection and portfolios that engage students and support their learning.

Lunch will be provided for workshop participants. Please register in advance with David Giovagnoli (dgiovagnoli@ilstu.edu). If you are interested in participating in one or both of these events and need a special accommodation, please contact David or the Writing Program.

Yancey Poster Final A3